Pearson BTEC Level 3 Advanced Manufacturing Engineering qualifications

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This QIP covers vocational qualifications which are not listed on the Department for Education (DfE) 16 – 19 performance tables for England.

These qualifications are not listed on the DfE 16 – 19 performance tables because they were not designed to meet the requirements of the Key Stage 5 performance tables.


This qualification family includes all Pearson BTEC Level 3 Advanced Manufacturing Engineering qualifications which develop technical knowledge. There are currently two Level 3 qualifications:

  • Pearson BTEC Level 3 Diploma in Advanced Manufacturing Engineering (Development Technical Knowledge)
  • Pearson BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma in Advanced Manufacturing Engineering (Development Technical Knowledge)

Both qualifications are available as:

  • a general qualification
  • an Electrical/Electronic Engineering pathway
  • a Mechanical Engineering pathway
Countries
  • England
  • Northern Ireland
Purpose

Vocational qualifications are either work-related qualifications designed to enable students to gain the skills required to perform a particular job, or qualifications that may be taken as part of a wider study programme or an apprenticeship.

Schools and colleges may offer qualifications that are not included in the DfE performance tables, if approved for teaching to 16-19 year olds by the Secretary of State for Education in England under Section 96, where this is in the best interests of individual students.


These qualifications were designed to meet the requirements of an engineering apprenticeship and also to prepare students for progression to a range of higher education programmes. Either of the qualifications may be used to meet a mandatory requirement in the Automotive Trailblazer: Level 3 Apprenticeship Mechatronics Standard.

Education context

These qualifications are designed for post-16 students and fall under the oversight of the Department of Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) and the Education and Skills Funding Agency (ESFA). A significant number of students will undertake these qualifications post-19.

Following its 2012 review of post-19 qualifications the ESFA removed 1,800 qualifications from public funding and a further 1,000 in 2014. In March 2014 the government published a Reform Plan for Vocational Education.

These qualifications have not been subject to the same reforms as Applied General and Tech Level qualifications (which are specifically designed for 16-19 year old students), however the ESFA has implemented a new set of business rules for the approval of qualifications for funding, based on the 2013 Review of Adult Vocational Qualifications in England. These rules recognise that adults may have different needs, aspirations and ambitions to younger people and include that qualifications should be:

  • relevant to individuals and employers and affordable for all sizes of business and for individuals
  • rigorous and based on a robust future-looking occupational standard designed and assessed by the sector
  • recognised as worthy of investment, giving a clear signal of the economically valuable skills, knowledge and understanding required in an occupation now and in the future.

Regulation of vocational qualifications

The regulation of vocational qualifications is the responsibility of the respective regulators in each UK country – Ofqual (England), CCEA Regulation (Northern Ireland), SQA (Scotland), and Qualifications Wales (Wales). The regulatory approach undertaken for vocational qualifications is different from A levels. This is because there are no specific qualification criteria for vocational qualifications, as there currently are for GCSEs, AS and A levels. Vocational qualifications must comply with the regulator’s general rules, as is the case with all regulated qualifications.


These qualifications are supported by:

  • the Advanced Engineering and Manufacturing Apprenticeship Employer Group, which includes, Jaguar Land Rover, Toyota, Ford, BMW, Vauxhall, Aston Martin, Nissan, GTA England
  • the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) professional society for the engineering and technology community
  • the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE) professional engineering institution
  • Semta, the Sector Skills Council for the Engineering sector
  • the National Forum of Engineering Centres (NFEC).

The qualifications are delivered by FE colleges or training providers. Some students will be taking one of the qualifications as their main learning aim, while others will be taking it as part of an apprenticeship.

Awarding organisation
  • Pearson (Edexcel)
Qualification codes
601/9054/1 (Pearson BTEC Level 3 Diploma in Advanced Manufacturing Engineering (Development Technical Knowledge))
601/9060/7 (Pearson BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma in Advanced Manufacturing Engineering (Development Technical Knowledge))
Structure

The qualifications are unitised. Almost all of the units have 60 guided learning hours.

The general qualifications have the following structures:

  • Diploma - 3 mandatory units (25%) and at least 8 (selected from 70) optional units (75%)
  • Extended Diploma - 3 mandatory units (16.7%) and at least 14 (selected from 70) optional units (83.3%)

The Electrical/Electronic Engineering pathway qualifications have the following structures:

  • Diploma - 5 mandatory units (33.3%) and at least 6 (selected from 25) optional units (66.7%)
  • Extended Diploma - 5 mandatory units (22.2%) and at least 12 (selected from 25) optional units (77.8%)

The Mechanical Engineering pathway qualifications have the following structures:

  • Diploma - 5 mandatory units (33.3%) and at least 6 (selected from 21) optional units (66.7%)
  • Extended Diploma - 5 mandatory units (22.2%) and at least 12 (selected from 21) optional units (77.8%)

The qualifications are designed to be delivered in a holistic way, integrating the development of knowledge and understanding with the development of practical skills. The balance between the two depends on the optional units taken but, generally, it is around 60% theoretical learning and 40% practical learning.

Subject areas
  • Mathematics
  • Electrical/electronic engineering
  • Mechanical engineering
  • Aeronautical engineering
  • Manufacturing engineering
  • Vehicle technology

The following units are mandatory in all qualifications and pathways:

  • Health and safety in the engineering workplace
  • Communications for engineering technicians
  • Mathematics for engineering technicians

The following units are mandatory in the Electrical/Electronic Engineering pathways:

  • Electrical and electronic principles in engineering
  • Further electrical principles

The following units are mandatory in the Mechanical Engineering pathways:

  • Mechanical principles of engineering systems
  • Further mechanical principles and applications
Levels
  • Level 3

Level 3 qualifications are regulated to the Regulated Qualifications Framework (RQF) in England and Northern Ireland and the Credit and Qualifications Framework for Wales, though many may be offered on a three-country basis.

Level 3 is broadly aligned to the Scottish Credit and Qualifications Framework (SCQF) Level 6 / 7.

Grading

The units are all graded Pass/Merit/Distinction.

All of the qualifications are graded Pass/Merit/Distinction.

To calculate the qualification grade, the unit grades are converted into points according to their size. Almost all of the units have 60 GLH.

Grade

60 GLH unit

U

0

Pass

6

Merit

10

Distinction

16

The points are added up across the qualification and the qualification grades are determined as follows:

Grade

Points threshold for Diploma (720 GLH)

Points threshold for Extended Diploma (1080 GLH)

Distinction

144

216

Merit

104

156

Pass

72

108

U

0

0

The qualifications were developed for first teaching in 2016.

Assessment

The qualifications have 100% internal assessment. This is quality assured through external standards verification, comprising visits and remote sampling of the marking of assignments.

There are no units designated as synoptic units but some units are synoptic in practice, e.g. Unit 4 'Engineering Project'. Also, some units build on others, e.g. Unit 14 'Advanced Mechanical Principles and Applications' builds on the content of Unit 8 'Mechanical Principles of Engineering Systems'.

Contribution of assessment components to overall grade

Almost all of the units have 60 GLH. This means that the percentage contribution of each unit to the overall assessment is generally:

  • 8.3% in the Diploma
  • 5.6% in the Extended Diploma
Resit arrangements

It is recommended that centres follow the same rules as the BTEC Nationals which are:

  • one re-submission only for an assignment - to be completed within 15 working days of receiving the first result
  • an additional retake opportunity on a new assignment, capped at pass only.
Guided/notional learning hours
Pearson BTEC Level 3 Diploma in Advanced Manufacturing Engineering (Development Technical Knowledge): 720 hours
Pearson BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma in Advanced Manufacturing Engineering (Development Technical Knowledge): 1080 hours
Key issues for UK HE admissions

There are a number of key considerations for HEPs when reviewing vocational qualifications that are not listed on the DfE 16 – 19 performance tables for England:

  • Some of these qualifications are occupational, and may not be designed specifically for progression to HE.
  • Applicants holding these qualifications may be school or college leavers, however, some may be more mature students who are likely to have other relevant experience alongside these qualifications.
  • These qualifications may have been taken as part of a wider study programme or an apprenticeship.
  • These qualifications are 720 and 1080 GLH. If they are presented for admission to HE it is likely to be in conjunction with other qualifications.

Engineering employers and professional bodies were involved in the development of the qualifications, thereby helping to sure that the qualifications will prepare students for progression to employment or Higher Education.

Some students take the qualifications as part of an apprenticeship. Some take them as their main learning aim in a 16-18 full time programme and may progress into a technician role.

Some of the units in the qualifications were developed from the QCF BTEC Nationals in Engineering. Some of the units have been taken from the RQF BTEC Nationals in Engineering, including 'Calculus to Solve Engineering Problems', 'Further Engineering Mathematics' and four aeronautical engineering units. The qualifications will therefore prepare students for progression to HNCs, HNDs, foundation degrees, bachelor degrees and degree apprenticeships in engineering and engineering-related subjects.

Timing of assessments/results for learners

Students are assessed throughout their programme of learning and may submit units for qualification award at any point.

Results are provided on a rolling basis. Students submitting units for calculation of their qualification grade by the deadline for the summer will receive results in July.

Qualification date
Starting from 01 Sep 2016
Qualification dates notes

These are current qualifications.

The first certifications for the Diploma were in 2017.

The first certifications for the Extended Diploma were in 2018.

Reporting and certification information

The results of Pearson BTEC Level 3 Diploma in Advanced Manufacturing Engineering (Development Technical Knowledge) and Pearson BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma in Advanced Manufacturing Engineering (Development Technical Knowledge) qualifications are reported to UCAS through Awarding Body Linkage (ABL).

View the results available through ABL.

These are relatively small entry qualifications and so Pearson does not publish certification details annually. Results data is shared with Ofqual and other regulators if they request it.

Progression information

Students who achieve the Pearson BTEC Level 3 Diploma or Extended Diploma in Advanced Manufacturing Engineering (Development Technical Knowledge) qualifications (including the specialist pathways in Mechanical Engineering or Electrical/Electronic Engineering) will have achieved 10% of the overarching Apprenticeship requirements. On completing their Apprenticeship, students can apply for Engineering Technician (EngTech) certification. Students who have achieved either the Diploma or Extended Diploma qualifications and not completed the full Apprenticeship could progress to technician roles where further training may be required. Alternatively they could progress to higher education to continue their course of study, for example HNCs, HNDs, foundation degrees, bachelor degrees and degree apprenticeships in engineering and engineering-related subjects.

These qualifications are supported by:

  • the Advanced Engineering and Manufacturing Apprenticeship Employer Group, which includes, Jaguar Land Rover, Toyota, Ford, BMW, Vauxhall, Aston Martin, Nissan, GTA England
  • the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) professional society for the engineering and technology community
  • the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE) professional engineering institution
  • Semta, the Sector Skills Council for the Engineering sector
  • the National Forum of Engineering Centres (NFEC).